Tag Archives: megan wynters

Recognition and Acceptance

It’s not you, Megan. It’s me.

We’ve started writing the sequel to Love at First Plight, and I am finding the process to be both easy and a challenge at the same time. I love writing my character, Megan Wynters. I really do. Slipping into her character is like sliding my feet into my favourite and most comfortable pair of shoes or like wrapping myself in a warm blanket.

Working on Book 2

At the same time, writing Megan can sometimes be a challenge. It’s fun challenge, mind you, but it’s a challenge all the same. The reason isn’t because I find her difficult to write, because that couldn’t be further from the truth. The trouble is that my personal writing technique can frustrate me, at times.

I am the type of writer who is in a continual state of self-analysis and who relies on structure to tell a story and to bring my character to life. While this does have its advantages, where it puts me at a disadvantage is that I tend to have a difficult time getting started.

In other words, I get ready to write, but instead of hitting the keys, my fingers remain poised above the keyboard as my mind processes the steps that I will take. Finally, I begin to type slowly, but steadily, as I figure out how I want to form the first sentence and build the first paragraph. Eventually, my fingers will fly across the keyboard as I let my imagination flow, but I’ve always been slow to start.

Even though writing Megan comes naturally to me, I have never sat down at my computer with the intention of writing her character and immediately typed full speed ahead. I build up speed over time.

While this usually isn’t a problem for me, when there are time constraints, I don’t always feel like I have the luxury to take the time I need to comfortably write as much as I want to complete.

This is the main challenge I am facing right now, as I write Book 2 in the Perspective series. It isn’t that I don’t know how to write my main character or that I don’t know how to get inside her head. It is that it takes me a surprising amount of time to get into the groove of storytelling, especially at the start.

After years of writing, I’ve learned that my particular creative writing skill requires a great deal of focus, structure, and organization. I need to write in a distraction-free zone, I need to channel my character, and I edit while I create. Yes, I’m guilty of editing while I work, which is something that most writers warn other writers not to do. Ideally, when writing creatively, you should write first and edit later, so you don’t disrupt your creative flow; a process that should look like this: Write. Edit. My writing pattern, on the other hand, functions more like this: Write-edit-write-edit. Edit. As you have likely guessed, writing this way can significantly slow me down.

That being said, what I’ve come to realize is that even though others might cringe at my writing technique, I can’t change the way that I write and I don’t want to change the way that I write; it works for me. I have developed my own style and my own creative method and it’s not wrong; it’s simply mine. It may not be the fastest process around, which can really frustrate me, especially when I’m pressed for time, but I’ve recognized and accepted that that’s how my creativity flows.

Unfortunately, all too often I’ve compared my writing style and speed to Julie’s and to other writers and this, in my opinion, has been my most self-destructive habit as a writer. I should never compare my skill to someone else’s; no writer should. You can appreciate another’s talents, but you shouldn’t judge your own talents against theirs or feel that because you don’t possess certain skills that the ones you do have are somehow less significant or have less value.Getting started is the hardest part

The bottom line is that comparing how I write and how I create to how someone else does it, serves no positive purpose. On the contrary, it makes me doubt my abilities as a writer. It makes my self-confidence shrink and my self-criticism swell. It makes me think illogically that I can’t write the story of a character that I’ve written dozens of times before, which is ridiculous.

Thankfully, this is an issue with which I am struggling less and less. However, I would be a liar if I told you that I don’t doubt my abilities as a writer and storyteller from time to time. Nevertheless, at the moment, I’m pleased to say that Megan’s side of the story is progressing well and I’m immensely enjoying the creative writing process as I always do.

So you see, any time I think I won’t be able to write Megan, it has nothing to do with her character and everything to do with my suddenly becoming ludicrous and losing my nerve as a writer. All I have to do is write her to realize that I haven’t lost my touch.

Therefore, if you ever find yourself doubting your abilities as a writer, try slipping into the role of one of the characters that you’ve created, and hopefully they will remind you of your incredible talents as you bring this character to life with every word that you write.

That is exactly what Megan does for me every time that I slip into her character.

Thanks, Megs 🙂

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Filed under Amanda Giasson

Am I Lost in a Fictional World?

Can creative writing be considered a mental illness?

 

Creative writing crazinessIf you love it too much, does it actually take over your mind, for good?

I’m a proud, card-carrying weirdo, and I’m certainly a top contender for geek-of-the-year (for over thirty years, running), but when it comes to writing the Perspective book series with Amanda, I am taken to an entirely different oddity plane. I stop living here and I start living on an entirely different world that exists inside my head.

On any given day, I think about the books, the characters, and the future direction of the plot, more times than I can count. I can honestly say that an hour hasn’t passed in fourteen years in which I have not thought about something happening on the planet Qarradune, at least once.

Writers are known for being a little bit on the different side (to say the least). I think the entire artistic community – actors, painters, authors, sculptors, singers, etc – has a certain requirement in terms of being somewhat strange. But at the same time, as much as I’m glad to be unique (some might say that “unique” is a rather kind way to describe myself), I do wonder if I am crossing the line from being a quirky artist in the creative writing world, and stepping over into madness.

Am I supposed to think about a fictional world this much? Are people who are figments of my imagination and who interact with people who are figments of Amanda’s imagination supposed to matter more to me than some of the characters I have met in real life?

The thing is, allowing my mind to drift over to Qarradune so that I can mentally hang-out with Irys Godeleva, Megan Wynters, Thayn Varda, and Acksil makes me very, very happy. Even Galnar can bring the occasional twisted smile to my face…hmmm, maybe I should be questioning the sanity of that, too…

Perspective book series - crazy writerOccasionally, I think that the fact that I am this passionate about the book is a good sign. A lot of famous authors are, after all, known for completely losing themselves in their fictional worlds, to very extreme degrees. Then again, many of those authors are also known for struggling with the real world and escaping through hard-core drugs or a permanent visit to the bottom of a river.

Will I be able to recognize if I ever make that leap from peculiar or eccentric to plain-old nuts?

For now, I plan to embrace my bizarre side and to keep loving the world that flows from my mind and out through my words. Hopefully, someone will let me know if I’ve made Qarradune my forever-home, so that they might help me come back to Earth to visit, now and again.

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Filed under Julie Campbell